Learning from Roger Ebert

Listening to Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert review movies was a staple in our house when we lived in Flossmoor, IL. They both were brilliant reviewers, but I’m with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes. I didn’t enjoy their bickering. Siskel was less animated while Ebert was over-the-top passionate about his opinions. I’m not a movie buff or aficionado, so although I respect Ebert’s fantastic writing skills and articulate explanations when discussing his reviews, what I admire most about him is his courage and cheerful attitude through his long battle with cancer.

All illnesses are burdens, especially the ones that ravage the body and transform it to what it shouldn’t be, yet it takes a real hero to rise about pain, deformity, exhaustion and the other hardships illnesses encumber. Ebert turned his negatives into positives, a life lesson for everyone to embrace. I can’t imagine not being able to speak, but Ebert found a way. He used social media to its height, remained cheerful and looked ahead to more accomplishments.

How can writers emulate his attitude and forge ahead despite drawbacks?
* When rejections flood your inbox, believe in yourself and send out more queries.
* When writer’s block grabs hold, step away from your computer and do something for someone,
e.g., call a shut-in, send a get-well card to a neighbor in the hospital or take some non-
perishables to a food pantry.
* Write out of your genre, e.g., an essay, short story or feature article.
* Read an editor’s or agent’s blog or an agency’s newsletter.
* Join a writers’ group and exchange ideas.

You are creative enough. Think of other ways to get your mind flowing in a positive direction. Do what Roger Ebert did: Used his skills to the max and made other people happy because of it.

Listening to Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert review movies was a staple in our house when we lived in Flossmoor, IL. They both were brilliant reviewers, but I’m with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes. I didn’t enjoy their bickering. Siskel was less animated while Ebert was over-the-top passionate about his opinions. I’m not a movie buff or affecianado, so although I respect Ebert’s fantastic writing skills and articulate explanations when discussing his reviews, what I admire most about him is his courage and cheerful attitude through his long battle with cancer.   All illnesses are burdens, especially the ones that ravage the body and transform it to what it shouldn’t be, yet it takes a real hero to rise about pain, deformity, exhaustion and the other hardships illnesses encumber. Ebert turned his negatives into positives, a life lesson for everyone to embrace. I can’t imagine not being able to speak, but Ebert found a way. He used social media to its height, remained cheerful and looked ahead to more accomplishments.

How can writers emulate his attitude and forge ahead despite drawbacks?
* When rejections flood your inbox, believe in yourself and send out more queries.
* When writer’s block grabs hold, step away from your computer and do something for someone, e.g., call
a shut-in, send a get-well card to a neighbor in the hospital or take some non-perishables to a food
pantry.
* Write out of your genre, e.g., an essay, short story or feature article.
* Read an editor’s or agent’s blog or an agency’s newsletter.
* Join a writers’ group and exchange ideas.

You are creative enough. Think of other ways to get your mind flowing in a positive direction. Do what Roger Ebert did: Used his skills to the max and made other people happy because of it.

Article By: admin


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  6. Patkai says:

    This made me so sad. When I was a mopey depressed adsnloceet, I started reading Roger Ebert’s Great Movies reviews, and then started buying them, and then studied cinema just for fun. It actually changed my life and made me fall in love with the cinema.His blog is one of the best things I have ever found on the internet. He’s just amazing. I am so, so sad. I got to feeling like I should have left him a comment or two to say thankyou.Anyway, it doesn’t surprise me that you’re a fan. I love your blog, Dorothy Snarker! For once I’m getting in there and actually saying something!

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